Juneau Nature

Natural & cultural history of Juneau & Southeast Alaska

Juneau Nature - Natural & cultural history of Juneau & Southeast Alaska

3 Glacier Bay

Sít’ Eetí Geeyí, bay in place of the glacier (Glacier Bay)

Surficial geology of lower Glacier Bay, based on IfSAR bare earth

Surficial geology of lower Glacier Bay, based on IfSAR bare earth

Sít’ Eetí Geeyí experienced the most dramatic Little Ice Age (~1550—1850AD) in the world. About 85% of the province was covered by ice to a depth of 1 mile in the upper reaches, sloping to the berg-spewing glacial terminus in Icy Strait (a name no longer descriptive). Many tidewater glaciers have since receded onto land. Recolonizing plants and animals followed, and after them, seal hunters, scientists and tourists. Today, ice cover is reduced to 41% of the province.

Glacier Bay's coniferous forest is confined to the older surface ages in the lower, more recently deglaciated forelands.

Glacier Bay’s coniferous forest is confined to the older surface ages in the lower, more recently deglaciated forelands.