Juneau Nature

Natural & cultural history of Juneau & Southeast Alaska

Juneau Nature - Natural & cultural history of Juneau & Southeast Alaska

Canids

Tracks of adult wolf and newborn Sitka black-tailed deer in dewatered pit pond, sphagnum bog, Kupreanof Island, June 18, 2005. This bambi would barely make an hors d'oeuvre for Southeast's top terrestrial carnivore.

Tracks of adult wolf and newborn Sitka black-tailed deer in dewatered pit pond, sphagnum bog, Kupreanof Island, June 18, 2005. This bambi would barely make an hors d’oeuvre for Southeast’s top terrestrial carnivore.

Juneau has 4 potential canids: 3 of them wild and one of them–depending on whom you ask–humanity’s best friend. Mink and marmot are less chummy with Canis familiaris.

Ultimately we’ll have sub-pages here for wolf and coyote–both fairly common around Juneau in recent years–and maybe just mention of red fox, an interior canid who rarely graces our region. But for now, let’s begin with a canid so ubiquitous you need to try pretty hard to find a place free of its tracks.

dogs&wildlife

In 2013, Juneau master naturalist Bob Armstrong collaborated with Gwen Bayluss and the Juneau Audubon board of directors on a position paper, as a public service and educational piece for outdoorspeople who try to minimize their impact on sensitive wildlife.

Download the 4-page Audubon pdf herepdf-logo

For more thoughts on dogs and wildlife, see Through the eyes of critters, pages 52-53 in Common tracks of Southeast Alaska, a 2013 tracking guide